Photo of Allan Hazlett

Allan Hazlett

Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Acting Director of Graduate Studies
PhD, Brown University
research interests:
  • Epistemology
  • Moral Psychology
  • Metaethics
  • Aesthetics

contact info:

mailing address:

  • Washington University
  • Campus Box 1073
  • One Brookings Drive
  • St. Louis, MO 63130-4899
image of book cover

Allan Hazlett's main areas of research is epistemology, with an emphasis on the social and political aspects of intellectual virtue.

Hazlett studied philosophy at Brown University, earning his doctorate in 2006. Since then he has worked for Texas Tech University, Fordham University, Dartmouth College, the University of Edinburgh, and the University of New Mexico. He is the author of two books: A Luxury of the Understanding: On the Value of True Belief (Oxford University Press, 2013) and A Critical Introduction to Skepticism (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014).

A Critical Introduction to Skepticism

A Critical Introduction to Skepticism

Skepticism remains a central and defining issue in epistemology, and in the wider tradition of Western philosophy. To better understand the contemporary position of this important philosophical subject, Allan Hazlett introduces a range of topics, including:

• Ancient skepticism
• skeptical arguments in the work of Hume and Descartes
• Cartesian skepticism in contemporary epistemology
• anti-skeptical strategies, including Mooreanism, nonclosure, and contextualism
• additional varieties of skepticism
• the practical consequences of Cartesian skepticism

Presenting a comprehensive survey of the key problems, arguments, and theories, together with additional readings, A Critical Introduction to Skepticism is an ideal guide for students and scholars looking to understand how skepticism is shaping epistemology today.

Allan Hazlett

Allan Hazlett

The value of true belief has played a central role in history of philosophy--consider Socrates' slogan that the unexamined life is not worth living, and Aristotle's claim that everyone naturally wants knowledge--as well as in contemporary epistemology, where questions about the value of knowledge have recently taken center stage. It has usually been assumed that accurate representation--true belief--is valuable, either instrumentally or for its own sake. In A Luxury of the Understanding, Allan Hazlett offers a critical study of that assumption, and of the main ways in which it can be defended.